You can listen to this episode using the player below, or using your favorite platform to subscribe and listen there.

In this episode, we meet Katelyn, a mum of two who planned a VBAC at home that ended in a c-section transfer.

I’m sharing Katelyn’s side of the story in her own words.

First pregnancy and birth

I had an emergency caesarean following an unwanted and unneeded postdate induction that I was coerced into.

I felt I had no real other option. I was under the care of a private obstetrician, not because I felt that it was the kind of care that most aligned with me but because I didn’t know how to otherwise get continuity of care (oh had I known then what I know now!)

DO YOU WANT TO ROCK YOUR VBAC?

CHECK OUT OUR AMAZING NEW MEMBERSHIP!

👉 CLICK HERE TO JOIN NOW (for only $7/month) 👈

Second pregnancy

With my second, I was planning a VBAC from the moment I left the operating theatre and that quickly became a HBAC plan. I hired a private midwife and a doula and had a far, far more relaxed pregnancy and was super looking forward to my birth at home without medical interference.

I ended up with a long labour that progressed very well to start with and then stalled about 8 hours in.

I was supported and encouraged to do what I felt was right, and so we kept at it at home for another 12 hours (with a visit to my chiro right at the end) before I decided it was time to head to the hospital for intervention.

I requested my waters be broken, which they did a little while after I arrived at the hospital. At about the 26-hour mark.

I was so exhausted that I physically felt I had reached my limit I could feel that she was still high and not properly engaged and I felt if couldn’t remain upright I would completely lose my hold on my contractions.

They had been strong and constant. The first 8 hrs of labour they were 3-4 minutes apart, they’d stretched out to between 5-10 minutes through the rest of the day and once we got to the hospital, and vocalising and moving through them was all I had to keep on top of it.

 

“I made an informed choice for an epidural, knowing it most likely was heading to theatre”

 

At that point, I knew I was heading down repeat caesarean territory and I made an informed decision to have an epidural.

Knowing that most likely I was heading to theatre but there was a small chance that it could be enough to relax me and allow my baby to descend.

After another couple of hours with an epidural, we made the call to head to the theatre, which was disappointing but also liberating.

To know I’d done everything I felt I needed to do, all the things I’d not had an opportunity to try the first time around (including forward leaning inversions through contractions and walchers position and everything!)

And I was relatively okay feeling like it was my decision at that point.

So yeah – not the classic homebirth story, but one I do think is important which is why I’m so open about sharing.

We do know that HBAC women generally have higher transfer rates than most homebirthers but that doesn’t mean it will be a negative or traumatic experience even if it ends with another caesarean.

Going to the hospital was my biggest fear (or so I thought.

In hindsight I think I actually had other unvoiced fears hiding under the surface that kept me from progressing in labour) and it turned out to be very okay.

I’d still plan a HBA2C in a heartbeat for my next baby if I get blessed to have a third!

 

The power of informed birth choices

Tune in to hear her story and gain valuable insights for your own birthing journey.

Enjoy this podcast episode!

Ashley x

 

Photographer source:
Natural Focus Birth Photography & Natural Focus Photograph @naturalfocus_birthphotography @naturalfocusphotography

Katelyn on Instagram

 

Ashley is on a mission to raise the rates of women having vaginal birth after Caesarean worldwide and empower women planning VBACs and HBACS.(Homebirth after Caesarean).

As a dedicated birth coach and mentor, Ashley works intimately with pregnant women, guiding them through the journey of overcoming fear and mindset challenges associated with VBACs and HBACS.

Join the Waitlist Here!

Success! Check your inbox Lovely!